Tag Archives: Divorce Financial Planning

It is Important to Review Miscellaneous Shared Expenses During the Divorce Process

There are some expenses like insurance, gym memberships, phone plans, and streaming services that are shared during the marriage. As the divorce process proceeds, you must take steps to remove yourself from joint accounts and establish them under your name to remove any personal or financial liability. Read this article for more ideas.

Raiding Your 401(K) Can Be a Divorce Disaster

Using 401(k) assets to pay for expenses during the divorce process can be costly. If you are under 59 ½ years old, you may have to pay income tax and a 10% penalty on the withdrawal. It may be a better option to take a loan against the 401(k) up to maximum of $50,000. But before resorting to raiding any retirement funds, it would be best to consult with a financial professional such as a certified divorce financial analyst who can review your options. Read this article for more information.

Being Involved in Financial Matters During Marriage Provides Better Outcomes After Divorce

Fidelity’s Divorce and Money Study provides some important insights regarding the effects of divorce on the financial and emotional well-being of couples. Being involved and engaged in financial matters during the marriage provides an advantage for dealing with the divorce and for recovering after the divorce. Read more about the study.

Am I due part of my wife’s pension after divorce?

Some employers still offer old-fashioned defined benefit pension plans to their employees. A divorce settlement may provide an employee’s ex-spouse with a present or future interest in the lifetime pension payments. To determine the marital portion of the pension it may be necessary to hire a pension consultant. This article provides useful information regarding the division of the marital portion of pension plans.

A thorny divorce problem: Splitting defined benefit plans

What is the best method for splitting a defined benefit plan in a divorce?

Qualified domestic relations orders (QDROs) are used to divide qualified retirement plans, such as 401(k)s, 403(b)s and defined benefit plans. Most often, defined benefit plans are available to workers in fields, such as teaching, military service, state and local government and manufacturing. There are two methods that can be used in a QDRO to split a defined benefit plan: shared interest or separate interest. The spouses will have conflicting objectives and it is important to review the options carefully. These methods are described in detail here.